Do you read your drafts aloud? Maybe you should and other writing tit bits.


SuperBanner_Creation_2015-05-04_112537 Wrtiting tips badge for write dorne may

It feels pretty stupid reading your drafts aloud, doesn’t it? What will people think? You’re a big head; you like the sound of your own voice and words?

And that’s the point of it all. Listening to the flow of your masterpiece… assuming it does flow and doesn’t jerk along. Are there any missing words, that we all mentally drop in, as we type, but fail to actually type?  Is it comfortable to read; even if you do feel daft? Do you actually like the sound of what you have written?

Fail to read your drafts aloud… at your peril.

Although it may be a good idea to save your draft readings for the comfort of your own, private space. The local tea rooms/library may not appreciate your great words of wisdom!

Found on tumblr.com
Found on tumblr.com

There are so many beautiful words to choose from here… um….gambol… I think. I feel like having a gambol in the spring meadows!

Found on Karaspartyideas.com
Found on Karaspartyideas.com

For those moments of doubt for us more mature would-be authors… you’re never too old to be an author. Take a look at these folk.

Found onessaymama.com
Found onessaymama.com

Finally, something I found about mind mapping. This appeals to me as it combines writing with drawing. As I understand it, it’s key to utilise your colours in a logical order. Me LOGICAL?

Found on core77.com
Found on core77.com

So, some inspiration for us, to assist us in getting that blog post/article/book put together today.

  • Collect your writer’s tools about you.
  • Select your beautiful words
  • Don’t let ridiculous thoughts of your age stop you… it’s a number; that’s all!
  • Get those ideas mind mapped. This also satisfies the arty farty/doodle type person. [I don’t do maths, lists and graphs. Give it to me in a picture!]

How about you?

  • Just how do you get your writing act together?
  • Do you plan?
  • Just go for it?
  • Mind map?
  • Do you have any favourite words?

Thanks for dropping by and have a great Monday. Here, it is public holiday and the sun has finally come out. That’s a definite gambol in the meadows, coming up.

Until the next time.

Dorne. 🙂

7 comments

  1. I’m often surprised by the huge resistance new writers have to reading their work aloud. It’s like wanting to compete in a 5K without breaking a sweat. Doesn’t make sense to me. To your questions: Once I’ve mapped my story concept in pen, I plot my writing out on MS Excel. I can reorder my “rows,” insert ideas, shift things around easily, expand and contract, use the “columns” for references and notes. How’s that for odd! But it works or me.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That all sounds very organised and technical to me. But, at the same time… very clever. It is very much a question of finding something that works for us, isn’t it?
    Have a great day. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. As a narrator of audio books, as well as a writer, I couldn’t agree more on the reading aloud, Dorne! It’s a lot easier to feel the flow of the story and you might also be amazed how many typos you can pick up on. Often repeated words and phrases also stick out like sore thumbs when you do this as well! For instance, the one I’m working on now has various characters shrugging 40 times throughout the book and character names spelled wrong in several places, and if you have constant he said or she saids, you’ll soon realize how irritating they get after the first hundred or so!

    It’s actually so useful that I’ve started keeping an error log for the books I narrate so that I can let the authors have them at the end, should they want to upload an updated MS. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is one of my pet hates… he said, she said. As you so rightly say – very annoying.
      I always read my work aloud, to see if it flows and it’s just as well, because there is always something that I’ve missed.
      It’s easy to get to the end and be at the end of your tether; but that is when you need to really nick pick: to make your work the very best it can be.
      Thanks for your input. Have a great evening. 🙂

      Like

  4. Hey, Dorne, been loooong. Think of you often, have visited a couple of times. Guess Life happens, and I let it. You have been going strong and that’s so nice to see.

    Need to get back, to blog, miss you and my other blogging mates too much. I hope all is good with you. Thank you, for just being there. And no, I haven’t written anything for a while, just wanted to reach out to you. Cheers.

    Like

    • Hi Bharti, It’s great to hear from you.
      I hope you’re okay and I wondered what you were up to. Life sometimes gets in the way, doesn’t it? No correction… life always gets in the way!
      I look forward to reading your posts when you’re ready to post. I won’t go away. Take care. x

      Like

  5. I think reading your word aloud is such an important thing to do. We encourage everyone to do this at the Writer’s group that I belong to here in Cambridge. It’s quite daunting the first time you do it but it is amazing how hearing your written words spoken allows you to pick up faults in both the story and the dialogue. It’s well worth doing. In fact I do believe that some books work really well as audio books particularly those which tend to read a bit like a play, or are written by drama students, or playwrights!

    Like

Go on...make my day/life and leave a comment. I don't bite...much!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s